Mar
23
6:30 pm

Monday, Mar. 23, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Boyd 001

On behalf of numerous co-sponsoring organizations, the SAGE Center is proud to announce the following series of events to celebrate Women's History Month. This celebration was first ordained by presidential proclamation as Women's History Week in 1980, and expanded to the full month of March in 1988. The National Women's History Project provides an annual theme, and this year the theme is "Weaving the Stories of Women's Lives." We hope you plan to support one or more of these events and take time to consider how integral the many threads of womens' influence have been in your own life's tapestry.

This powerful documentary digs into how women are represented in the media and positions of power. A discussion guided by professors Mary Beth Ray and Diane Hotten-Somers will follow.

Mar
11
7:00 pm

Wednesday, Mar. 11, 7:00-8:30 p.m.
Hyde 220

On behalf of numerous co-sponsoring organizations, the SAGE Center is proud to announce the following series of events to celebrate Women's History Month. This celebration was first ordained by presidential proclamation as Women's History Week in 1980, and expanded to the full month of March in 1988. The National Women's History Project provides an annual theme, and this year the theme is "Weaving the Stories of Women's Lives." We hope you plan to support one or more of these events and take time to consider how integral the many threads of womens' influence have been in your own life's tapestry.

A fun and informative summary of women's history in America with professor Rebecca Noel.

Mar
5
5:30 pm

Thursday, Mar. 5, 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Memorial 010

Problem Solving in Metro Boston with GIS
Presented by: Adam Kurowski (Geography '01),
GIS Director for Arlington, MA

How do you get rid of 100 feet of snow in urban areas?
Why do cities need geographic information to function?
How do you decide which schools children are assigned to?

Find out the answers to these and other questions regarding Geographic Information Systems in today's governments, and find out just how important this technology is in problem solving and real-time decision making in today's society, as well as where this technology can take us in the future.

Dec ’14
10
11:15 am

Wednesday, Dec. 10, 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Rounds 304

Travels through Peru
(Bolivia & Chile)

Zak Brohinsky
Adjunct Faculty
Department of Social Science

I’m drawn to places with exotic names – Ayacucho, Lake Titicaca, Iquitos, the Andes, La Paz, Machu Picchu. I stare at place names on maps and the tiny symbols that represent areas unknown to me. People inhabit these wild lands and I’m curious to meet them. In the summer of 2014, after years of dreaming, I visited some of these exotic places; spoke with the people, witnessed their traditions, tasted their food, experienced daily life, and connected with landscapes that humbled me.

Come with me as we travel the spine of the Peruvian Andes, float on Lago Titicaca, bike “the most dangerous road”, hitch a ride with a Chilean trucker, ski enormous sand dunes, swim in the Amazon River, and hike one of the world’s most beautiful treks.

See photos and listen to stories from 2-1/2 months of travel through Peru, Bolivia, and Chile.

Oct ’14
15
3:30 pm

Wednesday, Oct. 15, 3:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m.
Boyd 144

Karen Beaudin is the published author of A Child is Missing-a true story and public speaker. She addresses the subject of unsolved murders, the missing and unresolved deaths to law enforcement at homicide training sessions around the United States and in universities to criminal law students. She's an advocate for Cold Case Units and the creation of websites that list the unsolved, the missing and unresolved deaths in every state. These websites can provide valuable information to law enforcement and makes available a place to leave anonymous tips. They also assure victims families that their loved one has not been forgotten.

In 2009 she and her sisters were influential in establishing New Hampshire's first Cold Case Unit. During Victims' Rights Week, 2010, the Gloddy family received a certificate of appreciation from Governor John Lynch for their outstanding service on behalf of victims' of crime. In 2012 the Ohio Attorney General recognized Karen for her advocacy in promoting Cold Case Units. The Fraternal Order Of Police in Ohio acknowledged her valuable contribution to Ohio's law enforcement community and the Ohio Unsolved Homicides Initiative. Karen has designed the Victims of Violent Crimes Bracelet for those affected by violent crimes and donates to organizations such as CUE (Community United Effort) a nonprofit that search for the missing.

Recently Karen spoke at four Homicide Initiative Training Sessions in Ohio for the Bureau of Criminal Investigations. In 2014 she spoke at the 10th Annual Missing Person’s Conference in North Carolina.

All is done in memory of her sister Kathy Gloddy, murdered in NH on November 21, 1971. An arrest has never been made.

 

This event is sponsored by the Criminal Justice Department.

Oct ’14
7
6:00 pm

Tuesday, Oct. 7, 6:00 - 7:30 p.m.
Bradford Room

Mental Illness Awareness Week is October 5-12, 2014

In recognition of Mental Illness Awareness Week, the Mental Health Issues Class (Health and Human Performance Dept) is hosting a Mental Health ForumIn the Bradford Room in Centre Lodge on Tuesday, October 7 from 6:00-7:30 p.m..

Students from the Mental Health Issues class have coordinated with NAMI NH's In Our Own Voice program to bring in speakers who will talk about their personal experience living with and recovering from mental illness.

These presentations are inspiring, educational, and valuable to students and faculty alike who have interest in mental illness from a personal and/or professional point of view. We hope that you will encourage student attendance at this event for class credit or just personal benefit.

We welcome anyone who wishes to join us. There is no charge for this presentation. A variety of literature and resources will be available. We encourage professors to give your students credit to attend this informative event.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact:
Elaine de Mello
edemello@naminh.org

Supported by: PSU Health and Human Performance; National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI NH) and through a grant with Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Apr
7
7:00 pm

Tuesday, Apr. 7, 7 p.m.
Smith Recital Hall, Silver Center for the Arts

Is the United States a Democracy or an Oligarchy 

In a well-functioning democracy, the preferences and needs of ordinary citizens help shape government policy. By this measure, American democracy is failing. To assess the influences on federal government policymaking, Gilens gathered data on thousands of proposed policy changes over four decades. His analyses of these data show that economic elites and interest groups have considerable sway over policy outcomes, and ordinary citizens have little or none. He’ll discuss what this research reveals about the failures of America’s democratic institutions, as well as the kinds of reforms that might give greater voice and political influence to ordinary citizens.

Martin Gilens is professor of politics at Princeton University and author ofAffluence and Influence: Economic Inequality and Political Power in America.

 

All Sidore lectures are free and open to the public. Tickets are required and may be picked up at the Silver Center Box Office. Reservations are recommended: call (603) 535-ARTS. A reception with light refreshments follows each lecture.

For more information on the series, visit the Sidore Lecture Series website.

Mar
9
7:00 pm

Monday, Mar. 9, 7 p.m.
Smith Recital Hall, Silver Center for the Arts

Convention, Culture, and Corruption: Democracy in Africa 

The past speaks to the present, in an ongoing conversation on democracy as a political system, a model, and an adaptation. Africans do not define democracy as distinct from, nor outside of, the definition of development. That linkage creates yet another problematic question: can leadership and institutions that do not deliver development be treated as democratic? The lecture will argue that the Western-liberal definition of democracy is limited in its application, and that reading Africa through Western literature is not always useful. Democracy in Africa contains dosages of militarism, authoritarianism, and prebendalism, while being constrained by the pressures of globalism.

Toyin Falola is the Jacob and Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair in the Humanities, and University Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Texas at Austin. He is a Fellow of the Historical Society of Nigeria, a Fellow of the Nigerian Academy of Letters, and the author of The Power of African Cultures, Nationalism and African Intellectuals.

All Sidore lectures are free and open to the public. Tickets are required and may be picked up at the Silver Center Box Office. Reservations are recommended: call (603) 535-ARTS. A reception with light refreshments follows each lecture.

For more information on the series, visit the Sidore Lecture Series website.

Feb
5
7:00 pm

Thursday, Feb. 5, 7 p.m.
Smith Recital Hall, Silver Center for the Arts

Who Has a Megaphone? Who Speaks in a Whisper?: Unequal Political Voice and the Broken Promise of American Democracy 

While inequalities of income are currently in the spotlight, political inequality receives much less attention.  A basic tenet of democracy is that the preferences and needs of all citizens should receive equal consideration.  Political voice—expressed when citizens vote, get in touch with public officials, protest, join organizations that take stands in politics, make political contributions, or otherwise take part in political life—informs policy makers of citizen preferences and needs.

Policymakers do not hear from everybody, and the people and political organizations they do hear from are not representative of the American public.  Those who express political voice, especially those who make financial contributions, are, on average, better educated and more affluent, and since the Supreme Court has taken the lid of campaign contributions, those with deep pockets are poised to speak even more loudly in politics.  If political voice is unequal, then democratic equality is jeopardized.

Kay Schlozman is the J. Joseph Moakley Professor of Political Science at Boston College and author of The Unheavenly Chorus: Unequal Political Voice and the Broken Promise of American Democracy.

All Sidore lectures are free and open to the public. Tickets are required and may be picked up at the Silver Center Box Office. Reservations are recommended: call (603) 535-ARTS. A reception with light refreshments follows each lecture.

For more information on the series, visit the Sidore Lecture Series website.

Mar
7
11:00 am

Saturday, Mar. 7
11am Lecture/performance
3:15pm Concert

Smith Recital Hall

FREE

At 11am, the public is invited to hear Dr. Carleen Graff present a lecture/performance featuring the piano works of a contemporary composer and at 3:15pm, the winners of the 15th annual Contemporary Piano Festival and PSU piano students will play a final concert of the day.